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Thomas D. Clark Center for Kentucky History

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100 W Broadway St
Frankfort, KY 40601 United States

May 2021

Katherine Jackson French: Kentucky’s Forgotten Ballad Collector

May 7 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Thomas D. Clark Center for Kentucky History, 100 W Broadway St
Frankfort, KY 40601 United States
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As we prepare to sing My Old Kentucky Home on Derby Day, join us via Zoom* to learn more about a different type of Kentucky music: traditional Appalachian ballads. Professor Elizabeth DiSavino will share the life and work of Kentuckian Katherine Jackson French, who spent her career researching traditional Appalachian music, igniting a resurgence of interest that continues today. French’s collection of Kentucky ballads challenged Appalachian stereotypes, elevating the status of women, and revealing complex local dialects and ethnic roots. This should have been her crowning scholarly achievement, but the collection was never published – until now. Appearing for the first time in DiSavino’s book, French’s collection of ballads could help to re-shape conceptions of Appalachia. Come and join the conversation!
The registration deadline is 10 am on the day of the event. Questions? Contact us at [email protected] or call 502-782-8070.

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June 2021

Recused from Oblivion: Historical Cultures in the Early United States, with Dr. Alea Henle

June 4 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Thomas D. Clark Center for Kentucky History, 100 W Broadway St
Frankfort, KY 40601 United States
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When the founders of the Kentucky Historical Society chartered their new organization in 1836, they were part of a trend: a growing number of Americans who were interested in preserving the country’s historical documents and artifacts. Join us via Zoom* as Dr. Alea Henle shares the stories of these early American historical societies, which flourished across the United States in the 19th century. While they established many practices still embraced today, they also faced challenges to their historical authority, from those who wished to document more inclusive histories. Come and join the conversation!
Dr. Henle holds a Master of Library Science from Simmons College and a Ph.D. in American History from the University of Connecticut. She is an associate librarian and head of the Access and Borrow Department at Miami University (OH) Libraries.
The registration deadline is 10 am on the day of the event. Questions? Contact us at [email protected] or call 502-782-8070.

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July 2021

A Shot in the Moonlight: How a Freed Slave and a Confederate Solder Fought for Justice in the Jim Crow South, with Ben Montgomery

July 2 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
Thomas D. Clark Center for Kentucky History, 100 W Broadway St
Frankfort, KY 40601 United States
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On the night of January 21, 1897, a white mob attacked the home of George Dinning, a formerly enslaved farmer in Simpson County, Kentucky. As the crowd fired their guns into his house, Dinning shot back in self-defense, killing a young man. “So began one of the strangest legal episodes in American history – one that ended with Dinning becoming the first Black man in America to win damages after a wrongful murder conviction.” Join us via Zoom* as journalist Ben Montgomery shares this dramatic and unlikely story of justice, “in a time and place where justice was all too rare.” Come and join the conversation!
An award-winning journalist, Ben Montgomery spent the majority of his newspaper career as an enterprise reporter for the Tampa Bay Times. He is the founder of the narrative journalism website Gangrey.com and helped launch the Auburn Chautauqua, a Southern writers collective. Learn more about his work at www.benmontgomerywrites.com.
The registration deadline is 10 am on the day of the event. Questions? Contact us at [email protected] or call 502-782-8070.

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August 2021

Literacy in the Mountains: Community, Newspapers, and Writing in Appalachia, with Dr. Samantha NeCamp

August 6 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Thomas D. Clark Center for Kentucky History, 100 W Broadway St
Frankfort, KY 40601 United States
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For decades, the popular media has often wrongly depicted Appalachia as a place of ignorance and isolation. Dr. Samantha NeCamp takes on these misrepresentations. University Press of Kentucky lauds NeCamp’s book as “reclaim the long history of literacy in the Appalachian region.” Focusing on five Kentucky newspapers published between 1885 and 1920, Dr. NeCamp explores “the complex ways readers in the mountains negotiated their local and national circumstances through editorials, advertisements, and correspondence…reveal an engaged citizenry specifically concerned with education…and demonstrat that Appalachians are not – and never have been – an illiterate, isolated people Join us via Zoom* to come and join the conversation!
Dr. Samantha NeCamp is an Associate Professor of English at the University of Cincinnati. She earned both her B.A. and M.A. in English at the University of Kentucky and received her Ph.D. in Rhetoric and Composition from the University of Louisville.
The registration deadline is 10 am on the day of the event. Questions? Contact us at [email protected] or call 502-782-8070.

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Frankfort Public Art

Frankfort/Franklin County Tourist & Convention Commission
300 Saint Clair St., Suite 102
Frankfort, KY 40601

800-960-7200
502-875-8687